Photography of Birds – Set # 216

Set # 216


Blue Jay


Blue Jay

Blue Jay


Blue Jays have strong black bills which they use for cracking nuts, usually while holding them with their feet, and for eating corn, grains and seeds. Its food is sought both on the ground and in trees and includes virtually all known types of plant and animal sources, such as acorns and beech mast, weed seeds, grain, fruits and other berries, peanuts, bread, meat, small invertebrates of many types, scraps in town parks, bird-table food and rarely eggs and nestlings.

Eastern Bluebird  (M)


Eastern Bluebird (M)

Eastern Bluebird (M)


Eastern Bluebirds thrived in the 1700s and 1800s. This flourishing is thought to be connected with the activity of settlers. Clearing forests made new habitat available for bluebirds and nesting sites were created in the increasing numbers of apple orchards and in wooden fence posts that eventually rotted.  It is believed that bluebirds were most abundant around 1900. However, increasing competition with the invasive species of European Starlings and House Sparrows along with loss of farmland began to take a toll on bluebird populations.

© HJ Ruiz – Avian101

11 thoughts on “Photography of Birds – Set # 216

  1. I’m always happy when someone highlights the Bluejays; they’re one of my favorite birds. They can be a little pushy and raucous, but they certainly aren’t mean, as some people think.

    • The difference in shade of blues between both plumages is that the bluebird is produced by dyes ingested in feeding. The blue jay is the structure of the feather that produces the effect of a prism and reflects only blue hue. The feather is light gray originally. Isn’t it cool? Thank you, Donna. 🙂

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