Photography of Birds – Set # 162

Set # 162


European Starling


European Starling

European Starling


The common starling has about 12 subspecies breeding in open habitats across its native range in temperate Europe and across the Palearctic to western Mongolia, and it has been introduced to Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the United States, Mexico, Argentina, South Africa and Fiji. This bird is resident in western and southern Europe and southwestern Asia, while northeastern populations migrate south and west in the winter within the breeding range and also further south to Iberia and North Africa. The common starling builds an untidy nest in a natural or artificial cavity in which four or five glossy, pale blue eggs are laid.

Common Grackle


Common Grackle

Common Grackle


Adults Common Grackles have a long, dark bill, pale yellowish eyes, and a long tail; their feathers appear black with purple, green, or blue iridescence on the head, and primarily bronze sheen in the body plumage. Adult females, beyond being smaller, are usually less iridescent; their tails in particular are shorter, and unlike the males, do not keel (display a longitudinal ridge) in flight and are brown with no purple or blue gloss. Juveniles are brown with dark brown eyes.

Β© HJ Ruiz – Avian101

12 thoughts on “Photography of Birds – Set # 162

  1. Beautiful pictures! Just saw a Starling in my Black Cherry Tree outside my window. It is the only non-native bird I’ve seen where I live so far.

  2. I had never seen a starling until I saw a pair in a subway station in Berlin. They were beautiful. I had to look up what kind of bird I had seen. I love your bird posts. ☺️

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