Photography of Birds – Set # 121

Set # 121


Tufted Titmouse


Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse


Its habitat is deciduous and mixed woods as well as gardens, parks, and shrublands. Although the tufted titmouse is non-migratory and originally native to Ohio and Mississippi, factors such as bird feeders have caused these birds to occupy a larger amount of territory across the United States and stretching into Ontario, Canada. From 1966 – 2015 the tufted titmouse population has increased by more than 1.5% per year throughout the northeastern U.S., Michigan, and Wisconsin.

Chipping Sparrow


Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow


In the winter, chipping sparrows are gregarious and form flocks, sometimes associating with other bird species. They mostly forage on the ground for seeds and other food items, as well as clambering on plants and trees, feeding on buds and small arthropods. In the west of their range they breed mainly in coniferous forests, but in the east, they choose woodland, farmland, parks and gardens. Breeding starts in late April and May and the nest is often built in a tree.

Β© HJ Ruiz – Avian101

12 thoughts on “Photography of Birds – Set # 121

  1. A joy to see both of these photos, HJ, and learn more about the species. Interesting that the tufted titmouse is originally native to OH and Miss. They don’t live on the west coast, so it’s espec. fun to see this one here today. There’s a coyness in this capture that is espec. fun to see.

  2. Two very sweet birds, the first one I saw in Ontario where I grew up but it is not in the west. We watched a Chipping Sparrow nest on a ledge in the awning above the front door to the house one year..

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: